≡ Menu

Pictures of Canadian Meteorite Fragments

University of Calgary graduate student Ellen Milley poses with a fragment of a meteorite in a small pond. AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Geoff Howe

University of Calgary graduate student Ellen Milley poses with a fragment of a meteorite in a small pond. AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Geoff Howe


On Nov. 27, planetary scientist Dr. Alan Hildebrand from the University of Calgary and graduate student Ellen Milley brought reporters to a site where they have found numerous meteorite fragments from the bolide that streaked across the sky in Western Canada on Nov. 20. The area where the meteroite fragments were found is called Buzzard Coulee, about 40 kilometers from the town of Lloydminster, on the Alberta-Saskatchewan border. There, around a frozen pond, numerous small rocks and pebbles could be seen that the scientists said were from the meteorite. No large chunks were spotted, however, reporters said.

Fragments of a meteorite were found in a small pond at Buzzard Coulee, Sask. on Friday. (Geoff Howe/CP)

Fragments of a meteorite were found in a small pond at Buzzard Coulee, Sask. on Friday. (Geoff Howe/CP)

The fireball that streaked across western Canadian skies was witnessed by thousands, and Hildebrand believes it was a 10-ton fragment from an asteroid. Videos from surveillance and police cameras showed the meteor exploding before it hit the ground. Reporters were told those observations, combined with the physical evidence, give scientists a treasure trove of data that could give them a better understanding of the solar system. The reports don’t offer any indications of the type of meteorite the fragments are, but from the images they appear to possibly be iron. We’ll add more images and information as they become available.

Sources: CBC.com,
, Washington Post, Phys.Org

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also works with Astronomy Cast, and is a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

Comments on this entry are closed.

  • Bill November 30, 2008, 3:59 PM

    Is that it !!!! SHEEEESH. Please, print something when you actually know you have it. That could of been planted.

  • Dan Tillmanns November 30, 2008, 6:38 PM

    Well, what made the Barringer crater in Arizona? I thought that iron meteorites stuck together and made holes while the rocky ones broke apart.
    Sometimes, this kind of news on TV can be funny. KNBC-TV has a good weather bookie (Dallas Raines).
    Once, some years ago, a sizeable meteorite was tracked into the nearby Rose Valley. On TV, Mr Raines suggested that people head for the Rose Valley to look for pieces.
    Unfortunately, the Rose Valley contains millions of volcanic bombs from the cinder cone there. An expert might be able to spot a meteorite fragment but to the average person these things look alike.

  • okinawa November 30, 2008, 8:19 PM

    Wow so small, I expected something much bigger!

  • Andrew November 30, 2008, 8:39 PM

    “Wow so small, I expected something much bigger!”

    That’s what she said that’s what she said that’s what she said!

    That feels much better…

  • No November 30, 2008, 9:05 PM

    First!!!1!1!!

  • OilIsMastery December 1, 2008, 2:05 AM

    What meteorite? I don’t see the meteorite. All I see is Ms. Milley.

  • bigguylittlecoat December 1, 2008, 2:29 AM

    how far do you think it travelled before reaching us?
    Imagine what this rock has seen!

  • Robert December 1, 2008, 6:57 AM

    This rock won’t of seen too much….it has no eyes.

  • Anthonyx2 December 1, 2008, 11:49 AM

    That looks a lot like the tip of an iceberg. Hopefully many more pieces will show up.

    Yeah, maybe someone threw a handful of pieces on the pond to get all the trespassers off the scent of the real location…

  • James December 1, 2008, 7:32 PM

    Hey, Ms. Milley, Bet you could use some more tuition money. Just one small one would do. Say 15 grammer or so? Dr. Hillenbrand wouldn’t even know it was gone!

  • par3182 December 3, 2008, 5:11 PM

    homer simpson was right: “it’ll burn up in our atmosphere and whatever’s left will be no bigger than a chihuahua’s head”

  • burk March 5, 2009, 3:28 PM

    An estimate of asteroidal material between orbit of Mercury and Jupiter suggests that approximately 20x10exp21 ton of metal and rock exist in the inner solar system in the form of asteroids and unbound particles. This is about four times the mass of the Earth. The true quantity must be twice this figure. It is obvious that there is more to the inner solar system than what appears. One thing is for certain: genesis of the Earth is a continuing process. It would be wise to leave
    meteorites alone on the ground where they have fallen.

hide