An artists impression of what it would look like inside a wormhole. Pretty. (credit: Space.com)

Forget Black Holes, How Do You Find A Wormhole?

Article Updated: 26 Dec , 2015

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Finding a black hole is an easy task… compared with searching for a wormhole. Suspected black holes have a massive gravitational effect on planets, stars and even galaxies, generating radiation, producing jets and accretion disks. Black holes will even bend light through gravitational lensing. Now, try finding a wormhole… Any ideas? Well, a Russian researcher thinks he has found an answer, but a highly sensitive radio telescope plus a truckload of patience (I’d imagine) is needed to find a special wormhole signature…

A wormhole connecting two points within spacetime.
Wormholes are a valid consequence of Einstein’s general relativity view on the universe. A wormhole, in theory, acts as a shortcut or tunnel through space and time. There are several versions on the same theme (i.e. wormholes may link different universes; they may link the two separate locations in the same universe; they may even link black and white holes together), but the physics is similar, wormholes create a link two locations in space-time, bypassing normal three dimensional travel through space. Also, it is theorized, that matter can travel through some wormholes fuelling sci-fi stories like in the film Stargate or Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. If wormholes do exist however, it is highly unlikely that you’ll find a handy key to open the mouth of a wormhole in your back yard, they are likely to be very elusive and you’ll probably need some specialist equipment to travel through them (although this will be virtually impossible).

Alexander Shatskiy, from the Lebedev Physical Institute in Moscow, has an idea how these wormholes may be observed. For a start, they can be distinguished from black holes, as wormhole mouths do not have an event horizon. Secondly, if matter could possibly travel through wormholes, light certainly can, but the light emitted will have a characteristic angular intensity distribution. If we were viewing a wormhole’s mouth, we would be witness to a circle, resembling a bubble, with intense light radiating from the inside “rim”. Looking toward the center, we would notice the light sharply dim. At the center we would notice no light, but we would see right through the mouth of the wormhole and see stars (from our side of the universe) shining straight through.

For the possibility to observe the wormhole mouth, sufficiently advanced radio interferometers would be required to look deep into the extreme environments of galactic cores to distinguish this exotic cosmic ghost from its black hole counterpart.

However, just because wormholes are possible does not mean they do exist. They could simply be the mathematical leftovers of general relativity. And even if they do exist, they are likely to be highly unstable, so any possibility of traveling through time and space will be short lived. Besides, the radiation passing through will be extremely blueshifted, so expect to burn up very quickly. Don’t pack your bags quite yet…

Source: arXiv publication


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Titan
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Titan
January 21, 2008 7:37 PM

Its nice to know that mankind has finally decided to challenge the impossible.Cosmologists were obssesd with black holes while they were ignoring and even questioning the existance of Wormholes.Its time to take the existance of wormholes seriously.Their effects on the galaxy and the expanding universe cannot be ignored.

dutchartistjelke
Guest
dutchartistjelke
January 22, 2008 3:04 AM
There are many wormholes like black holes we know they exit in our universe and there are many other dimensions ,other dimensions feed our universe with energy and our universe feed the other dimensions if one universe become to big it will float over in a empty place between this dimensions and a new universe will be born there was never a big boom like science may say a new universe it start throughout a door point maybe throughout a black hole or a wormhole ,energy will float over and build a new universe also a old universe will become empty It be a eternal living circle, Be it divine I think so someone or something must have… Read more »
chrix
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chrix
January 21, 2008 10:34 PM

I think worm hole does exist because there must be a back door or alternative door to a different dimension, maybe our dreams that we have all night is actually the events that is happening in the other dimensions….well so the question is now how to hunt this holes..?

Qubix
Guest
Qubix
January 22, 2008 1:26 AM

“maybe our dreams that we have all night is actually the events that is happening in the other dimensions”

Don’t be so naive. Dreams have nothing to do with worm holes. Dreams are just results of the brain working overtime…because the only time the brain takes a rest, is when we’re dead.
I do think there might be some possibility of the existence of wormholes, but they could also be a mathematical leftover, just like it is mentioned in the article.

Chuck Lam
Guest
Chuck Lam
January 22, 2008 8:52 AM

Worm holes? Maybe! More than likely not! I believe there are only four dimensions to deal with. It appears all else is fantasy. based on math aberrations.

Molecular
Member
Molecular
January 22, 2008 3:43 AM

Are we so smart that we cannot fathom the thought of some alien civilization, millions of years ahead of us, possessing the capabilities to make use of a wormhole? I surely hope not.

Rev.
Guest
Rev.
January 22, 2008 3:48 AM

… OOOhhhhhhhhhhhhooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!

Rev.
Guest
Rev.
January 22, 2008 3:52 AM

What’s that sound? Du’no… but sounds like a “screaming banchee”… “Whoooa pilgrim get a grip on yer’ whiskey glass, before you a’searching fer a wormhole…”

Matthew Skrzypczak
Guest
Matthew Skrzypczak
January 22, 2008 7:34 AM

We can’t even leave Earth yet on a regular basis without something screwing up.
Sure NASA is filled with top minds, but if they made 136 million dollar error through faulty conversion…wtf.
Until there’s an efficient and cost effective way to travel outside of our Earth, I seriously doubt we need to worry about wormholes.
I honestly think it would be cooler to look at the Earth from a distance within my life time, rather than find out in 50 years “We may have found a wormhole, but now we need the technology to make it out of Earth on a regular basis”

CraigB
Guest
CraigB
January 22, 2008 5:56 AM

I’ve discovered a black hole….It resides in Chrix’s head.

PMF71
Member
PMF71
January 22, 2008 6:01 AM
If light is transmitted through a wormhole, and we can see stars in the centre, as explained in the article, that means the light is transmitted in an “orderly fashion”, meaning that the light is not scattered. Scattering of light renders it impossible ro recreate an image on the other side. But if it is true, then matter (at least seperate atoms or molecules) could very well also be transported in an “orderly fashion”. Now as a Stargate Fan, i know that in the series they postulate that matter passing through the artificial “event horizon” of the stargate is broken down into a matterstream and transmitted through the wormhole, and recontructed on the other side. Also quatum state… Read more »
Richie
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Richie
January 22, 2008 7:06 AM

Forget blackholes & wormholes, there are none near enough for us to worry about… What we should be worrying about is mess we are making of earths atmosphere…

Pedro
Guest
Pedro
January 22, 2008 7:25 AM

If light travels trhu a wormhole, surelly it wil be subject to a massive influence of gravity. In other words, similar to light in the neighbourhood of a blackhole, time will slow down, won’t it? Does that mean that they could be doorways, or windows, to a distant time – past or future, depending on wich side of the hole we are?

lamb of god
Guest
January 22, 2008 7:35 AM

i think its cool we are finally breaking the mold of our current way of thinking and beliveing the universe is as easy as building blocks in a lego set. there are plenty of things out there we don’t understand, and unfortunately i wont be around to understand them when we finally do. but being a star wars fan i would love to see some hyperspace travel, oh yea
check out this website and help make a difference
http://www.zeitgeistmovie.com

Peter
Member
Peter
January 22, 2008 8:40 AM
Matthew and Richie, how about we all bury ourselves in our own mundane worries and forget astronomy altogether? Much better. Who needs to strive for something beyond the common experience? Please, we’re on this site because we are interested in something grander, bigger than just our own personal experience. And Dutchart, punctuation doesn’t hurt. Please, don’t bother writing if you can’t be bothered to be understood. I wish the article had included more information. How can you see stars through a wormhole that are on “our side”. Aren’t those just in front of the hole? What might generate a wormhole? Couldn’t that just be another black hole? It obviously has to have a massive gravity well to unite… Read more »
alastair
Guest
January 22, 2008 8:46 AM
Seems some of the people here need to learn to distinguish fantasy from reality. The mathematical wormholes of general relativity bear scant relation to the wormholes in bad sci-fi like Star Trek or Stargate (which I enjoy watching as much as the next guy, but both shows have almost as many holes in their science as they do in their respective plots). Even more plausible efforts like Peter F. Hamilton’s recent Commonwealth trilogy take considerable liberties I think. I’d be as excited as anyone else if it turned out that we could use wormholes for transit, but I think in practice we’re much more likely to be limited to real space. In sci-fi terms, the future may be… Read more »
leafguy
Member
January 22, 2008 9:30 AM

Im all for the search for worm holes, but why not put money into something we know exists that can be attained in the next half century. There will be plenty of time to search for this if we don’t kill overselves in the next 50 years.

Dark Gnat
Guest
Dark Gnat
January 22, 2008 9:32 AM

Once upon a time, no one believed that black holes could exist either.

Then we looked for them.

We should not exclude the possibility. Mathematics predicts them, just as mathematic predicted black holes.

They may exist, they may not exist, but we should at least try to find out. Even if can never use them, they could be very valuable to science.

Kishkumen
Guest
Kishkumen
January 22, 2008 10:14 AM

I have yet to see the math whereby anything w/rest mass can travel through a wormhole w/o causing it to collapse. Even a single atom or cosmic radiation will do the trick. Though they may mathematically exist, their existence is so short lived, they evolve quickly into black holes at the first sign of matter entering them. I seriously doubt we will find them just open and remaining open for any sustainable worthwhile time length.

John Mendenhall
Member
John Mendenhall
January 22, 2008 10:42 AM

Hmm. And what do we see if we look down into one of those jets coming from the poles of a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy, in the moment before the radiation obliterates us?

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