How to Photograph the Night Sky, Even in Light-Polluted Skies: A Tutorial from Justin Ng

by Nancy Atkinson on June 9, 2014

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Rising Milky Way above Marina Bay Sands in Singapore on April 10,  2014.  Credit and copyright: Justin Ng.

Rising Milky Way above Marina Bay Sands in Singapore on April 10, 2014. Credit and copyright: Justin Ng.

We feature A LOT of astrophotos here on Universe Today, and we get many comments about them, too — with some people saying they could NEVER take photos of the night sky because they live in cities, or are too close to street or yard lights or other causes of light pollution.

Now, award-winning astrophotographer Justin Ng from Singapore has created a tutorial for how to photograph the night sky, even in light-polluted area.

“This tutorial shows you how I photograph the Milky Way that’s obscured by the extreme light pollution in Singapore, using photography equipments that you may already have and a workflow that probably works on most versions of Photoshop,” Justin writes, adding that the type of photo processing he uses in Photoshop can be achieved without purchasing additional plugins.

Justin says that taking pictures of the night sky is a way you can “do your part to promote public awareness of astronomy and the importance of preserving the beauty of our night skies through your images. And I am going to show you how you can do just that using photography equipment that you may already have and a workflow that probably works in most versions of Photoshop.”

For this tutorial, you will need some previous knowledge about basic photography and post-processing.

You can access the full tutorial here on Justin’s website.

The rising Milky Way at Sentosa Island in Singapore. Credit and copyright: Justin Ng.

The rising Milky Way at Sentosa Island in Singapore. Credit and copyright: Justin Ng.

Check out more of his work at his website, on Facebook or G+.

About 

Nancy Atkinson is Universe Today's Senior Editor. She also is the host of the NASA Lunar Science Institute podcast and works with Astronomy Cast. Nancy is also a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador.

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